Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

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Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

Post by pawnee » Fri Mar 28, 2008 4:06 pm

Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Species List As Of March 28, 2008
-- U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service News Release, 03/28/2008


Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Species List As
Of March 28, 2008

Contacts

Ed Bangs (406) 449-5225, x 204
Joan Jewett (503) 231-6211
Sharon Rose (303) 236-4580


Today, Friday, March 28, 2008, the northern Rocky Mountain gray wolf is
officially removed from the federal list of endangered species. The
States of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming will assume full management
authority for the continued conservation of the gray wolf. This wolf
population has exceeded its recovery goals for the past several years
and is now thriving. Presently, there are more than 1,500 wolves and at
least 100 breeding pairs in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. The Service and
States will cooperatively monitor the wolf population for the next five
years.

As part of the Service's delisting action, it designated the northern
Rocky Mountain wolf Distinct Population Segment (DPS) as that area that
includes all of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, the eastern third of
Washington and Oregon, and a small corner of north-central Utah.

This action will not affect the status of any wolves outside of the
northern Rocky Mountain wolf DPS. Wolves outside the boundaries of the
Rocky Mountain DPS and Western Great Lakes DPS (where it was delisted in
2007) will remain listed as endangered. A dispersing wolf would attain
the status of the area it is in. For example, if a wolf dispersed to
Colorado, it would be considered endangered, whereas a wolf that moves
into either DPS would be a delisted wolf and under the management of the
States.

Once a species is delisted a State or Tribe has sole management
responsibility. The Act includes many safeguards to ensure that the wolf
population will remain recovered for the foreseeable future. For
example, the Act mandates the Service to monitor the wolf population for
at least 5 years after delisting. This helps to ensure the population
remains above recovery levels and emerging threats do not jeopardize the
wolf population. Annual reports and the Service's analysis of these
reports will be posted on the Service website during that period.
Should the wolf population again become threatened or endangered, it
could be protected under the ESA again.

Gray wolves were previously listed as endangered in the lower 48 states,
except in Minnesota, where they were listed as threatened. The wolf
population in the Midwest was delisted in early 2007. With removal of
the northern Rocky Mountain population of gray wolves delisted, the
Service now oversees the only remaining gray wolf recovery program, the
southwestern U.S. wolf population.

Wolves in national parks will remain under the management authority of
the National Park Service. On national wildlife refuges, the individual
refuge should be contacted, unless a prior arrangement has been made
with the state fish and wildlife agency to allow wolf hunting on that
refuge. On tribal lands the Tribes have management authority, and they
should be contacted. On other lands, where wildlife is typically
managed by the respective State fish and wildlife agency, (including
federal lands such as those administered by the U.S. Forest Service or
BLM) the states should be contacted.

For more information on northern Rocky Mountain gray wolves, visit
www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/mammals/wolf/

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others
to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their
habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both
a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known
for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural
resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For
more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit
www.fws.gov.
http://www.wolf.org/wolves/news/live_ne ... sp?id=3053
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Re: Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

Post by MexicoWolf » Fri Mar 28, 2008 4:14 pm

WHAT!!!

:evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:
avatar (c) morodine @ dA
you may not believe, but even we were scared at first
it takes a lot of nerve to destroy this wondrous earth

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Re: Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

Post by ChocolateRain » Sat Mar 29, 2008 2:50 am

Was gonna post this but I guess I missed this thread. :oops:

A lot of people have been fussing about how once wolves are endangered they'll be brought right back on it but...
The Act includes many safeguards to ensure that the wolf
population will remain recovered for the foreseeable future
. For
example, the Act mandates the Service to monitor the wolf population for
at least 5 years after delisting. This helps to ensure the population
remains above recovery levels and emerging threats do not jeopardize the
wolf population.
Annual reports and the Service's analysis of these
reports will be posted on the Service website during that period.
Should the wolf population again become threatened or endangered, it
could be protected under the ESA again.
So are there any loopholes that will allow the mass killing of wolves or was all of that an exaggeration?

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Re: Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

Post by pawnee » Sat Mar 29, 2008 8:00 am

well this is just a generalization of the actual document. From what i read, as long as states and municpalities have control to the wolf population in their region, hunting wolves isn`t illegal. It clearly states that as long as your have proper permits from the Fish and Game department or whatever, than you can hunt wolves on private land. wthere hunting wolves on public land is up to the state.
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Re: Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

Post by CLBaileyi » Mon Mar 31, 2008 1:34 pm

Pawnee-

You are correct on the fact that once de-listing has occured, management is up to the states to determine how to manage the population-as long as the species will not become threatened or endangered again.

This is one of the reasons for the monitoring to occur after delisting. For peregrine falcons, we did the same thing (eagles too). Each monitoring might be a little different though. For example, with peregrines, USFWS decided to do a monitoring year once every three years, for five monitoring periods (basically covering 15 years time). They many do the monitoring on an annual basis, every two years for five periods, etc. It can really vary quite a bit. In the end though, if the population reaches low numbers according to the goals of the recovery plan, USFWS can do an emergency listing at either the threatened or endangered status. (As Chocolate Rain has also posted on this thread).

I know it can be difficult for people to consider hunting as a management tool for wolves, but as Canada and Alaska have found in North America-the population continues to remain stable or even grow (depending on the area or the country). Nothing about wolves is simple, and I doubt it ever will be.

The biggest controversy lately is about "significant portion of range" in the ESA...and I also doubt that will be decided to everyone's satisfaction.
" Many people think that conservation is just saving fluffy animals - what they don't realize is that conservation is war to prevent the human race from committing suicide. " Gerald Durrell (1925-1995)

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Re: Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Speci

Post by ArKtic Wolf » Tue Apr 08, 2008 7:25 am

pawnee wrote:Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Species List As Of March 28, 2008
-- U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service News Release, 03/28/2008


Northern Rocky Mountain Wolves Removed From Endangered Species List As
Of March 28, 2008

Contacts

Ed Bangs (406) 449-5225, x 204
Joan Jewett (503) 231-6211
Sharon Rose (303) 236-4580


Today, Friday, March 28, 2008, the northern Rocky Mountain gray wolf is
officially removed from the federal list of endangered species. The
States of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming will assume full management
authority for the continued conservation of the gray wolf. This wolf
population has exceeded its recovery goals for the past several years
and is now thriving. Presently, there are more than 1,500 wolves and at
least 100 breeding pairs in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. The Service and
States will cooperatively monitor the wolf population for the next five
years.

As part of the Service's delisting action, it designated the northern
Rocky Mountain wolf Distinct Population Segment (DPS) as that area that
includes all of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, the eastern third of
Washington and Oregon, and a small corner of north-central Utah.

This action will not affect the status of any wolves outside of the
northern Rocky Mountain wolf DPS. Wolves outside the boundaries of the
Rocky Mountain DPS and Western Great Lakes DPS (where it was delisted in
2007) will remain listed as endangered. A dispersing wolf would attain
the status of the area it is in. For example, if a wolf dispersed to
Colorado, it would be considered endangered, whereas a wolf that moves
into either DPS would be a delisted wolf and under the management of the
States.

Once a species is delisted a State or Tribe has sole management
responsibility. The Act includes many safeguards to ensure that the wolf
population will remain recovered for the foreseeable future. For
example, the Act mandates the Service to monitor the wolf population for
at least 5 years after delisting. This helps to ensure the population
remains above recovery levels and emerging threats do not jeopardize the
wolf population. Annual reports and the Service's analysis of these
reports will be posted on the Service website during that period.
Should the wolf population again become threatened or endangered, it
could be protected under the ESA again.

Gray wolves were previously listed as endangered in the lower 48 states,
except in Minnesota, where they were listed as threatened. The wolf
population in the Midwest was delisted in early 2007. With removal of
the northern Rocky Mountain population of gray wolves delisted, the
Service now oversees the only remaining gray wolf recovery program, the
southwestern U.S. wolf population.

Wolves in national parks will remain under the management authority of
the National Park Service. On national wildlife refuges, the individual
refuge should be contacted, unless a prior arrangement has been made
with the state fish and wildlife agency to allow wolf hunting on that
refuge. On tribal lands the Tribes have management authority, and they
should be contacted. On other lands, where wildlife is typically
managed by the respective State fish and wildlife agency, (including
federal lands such as those administered by the U.S. Forest Service or
BLM) the states should be contacted.

For more information on northern Rocky Mountain gray wolves, visit
www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/mammals/wolf/

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others
to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their
habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both
a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known
for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural
resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For
more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit
www.fws.gov.
http://www.wolf.org/wolves/news/live_ne ... sp?id=3053

Here's to the Grey Wolf! Hip hip, hooray! X3
You can't tame the beast.

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