Public Hearing In Ashland Next Week About Wolves

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Public Hearing In Ashland Next Week About Wolves

Post by Blightwolf » Wed May 11, 2011 11:52 am

Public Hearing In Ashland Next Week About Wolves
May 10, 2011

Citizens will have an opportunity to testify on the federal government’s most recent proposal to remove the gray wolf from the endangered species list in the western Great Lakes, including Wisconsin.

The U.S. Department of Interior's U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced on May 4 the publication of a new proposed rule for delisting wolves. The Fish and Wildlife Service will hold a 60-day public comment period on the new rule from May 5 through July 5.

A public hearing will also be held on the proposed delisting rule on May 18 at the Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center in Ashland. An informational meeting will be held from 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. and a public hearing will be held from 7:30 to 9 p.m.

Wolves continue to be protected as a federally endangered species until the rule process is played out and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources expects that process to continue until fall or early winter 2011. Once removed from the federal endangered species list, also referred to as delisting, wolves will be managed as a state protected wild animal in Wisconsin, which means they may not be killed unless specially authorized by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

"We thank Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar for responding to our petition for delisting and for recognizing that the state of Wisconsin is ready to assume management of gray wolf populations in the state," said DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp. "We strongly believe it is time to return management authority to the Great Lakes states and Tribes. Gray wolves have made a terrific recovery within our region, and now need to join the list of species successfully managed by the state. The Wisconsin DNR and our tribal partners are committed to use sound science for managing the state’s wolf population."

Source: http://ashlandcurrent.com/article/11/05 ... out-wolves
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Re: Public Hearing In Ashland Next Week About Wolves

Post by wq47 HawkTail » Wed May 11, 2011 4:54 pm

I personally think wolves are no longer endangered in most areas of the U.S., but should be protected with laws about hunting. Hunting to control the population is appropriate when the time comes.
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Re: Public Hearing In Ashland Next Week About Wolves

Post by SpiritPelt » Thu May 12, 2011 7:45 am

Wolves are not under the endangered line, but if people stop caring then they eventually will go down.

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Re: Public Hearing In Ashland Next Week About Wolves

Post by Koa » Thu May 12, 2011 5:18 pm

-moved to Wolf Conservation-
SpiritPelt wrote:Wolves are not under the endangered line, but if people stop caring then they eventually will go down.
wq47 HawkTail wrote:I personally think wolves are no longer endangered in most areas of the U.S., but should be protected with laws about hunting. Hunting to control the population is appropriate when the time comes.
If it comes where there is a significant or alarming rise in wolves preying on livestock (which can be/is a problem for many ranchers; although it is understandable when it may be an isolated case as well and the wolves need to be removed, with perhaps not as an "alarming" rate of livestock deaths cause by wolves) or it becomes a "wolf disaster" area and elk populations are drastically low, then it is fine to remove wolves. It is also fine to remove the conflicting wolves when they threaten human lives or become too habituated to people and such. Sure, it doesn't prevent future problems but it helps.
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