Mexican wolf information

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CLBaileyi
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Mexican wolf information

Post by CLBaileyi » Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:27 am

I thought some might be interested in learning more about the Mexican wolf recovery program. I know there is alot of information on the web about wolves and such, but sometimes it can be difficult to figure out which ones are full of facts and which ones might have some bad information. Below are some of the ones I always tell people to keep on their favorites list-they are by people involved in the program and have the latest information available for reports, etc.

I hope you enjoy them :D

US Fish and Wildlife Service-latest field reports, photos, list of captive facilities that are part of the captive breeding project where all of the wolves in the wild have some tie to (there were no wild Mexican wolves in the wild until they used some of the captive animals to begin the releases in 1998.
http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/

Arizona Fish and Game-annual field report, wolf territories in the wild, photos, making public comments about the program, etc.
http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/es/wolf_reintroduction.shtml

Mexican Wolf Field Trip Earth-photos, video, interviews and information on the Mexican wolf field project. They also have alot of other field projects all over the world.
http://www.fieldtripearth.org/div_index.xml?id=11
" Many people think that conservation is just saving fluffy animals - what they don't realize is that conservation is war to prevent the human race from committing suicide. " Gerald Durrell (1925-1995)

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Re: Mexican wolf information

Post by ChocolateRain » Mon Dec 31, 2007 5:53 am

Thanks for this I've been wanting to keep track of how the reintroduction has been going.

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CLBaileyi
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Re: Mexican wolf information

Post by CLBaileyi » Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:36 am

Here are the numbers from the recent field population survey for the Mexican wolf population in AZ/NM. The numbers are down from last year which is not surprising to anyone who follows this reintroduction project.


Quote:
MEXICAN WOLF POPULATION SURVEY COMPLETE


Contacts
Elizabeth Slown, 505-248-6909 or 363-9592

There are 52 Mexican wolves that have been counted in the wild at the end of 2007, according to the annual survey conducted by the Interagency Field Team for wolf reintroduction. Surveys are completed in January of each year. Pups born in the summer must survive to December 31 before they are counted into the total Mexican wolf population. There are 29 wolves in Arizona and 23 wolves in New Mexico.

The reintroduction of the Mexican wolf is a cooperative, multi-agency
effort between U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Arizona Game and Fish Department, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, White Mountain Apache Tribe, USDA Forest Service and USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Wildlife Services. The agencies have established the Adaptive Management Oversight Committee (AMOC) that jointly manage the wolf reintroduction program in New Mexico and Arizona.

Fixed-wing aircraft were used to locate packs whose members are wearing radio collars. A helicopter was then used to count uncollared wolves that are associated with collared wolves in any particular packs. If a wolf needed capturing, the helicopter crew used net guns or immobilizing drugs delivered via darts. Ten wolves were captured during the census and physically examined and inoculated. Ground crews, including a veterinarian, examined the wolves and administered the following vaccines: rabies; parvovirus, parainfluenza, canine distemper, coronavirus, adenovirus type 2, and Leptospira. These vaccinations help to protect both human and domestic animals, in the recovery area, from serious contagious diseases.

The numbers are down from last year's number of 59 Mexican wolves. Altogether, 22 wolves were removed from the wild in 2007 compared to 18 the previous year; 19 for depredating livestock (this includes their seven dependent pups), two for dispersing outside the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area and one for nuisance behavior. The alpha pair of the Durango Pack, along with a pup that would have been included in the count, went missing in November. Their disappearance is under investigation.

"Under the existing AMOC Standard Operation Procedures, we have to remove wolves that have three or more depredation incidents within a 12-month period," said Benjamin Tuggle, PhD, Regional Director for the US Fish and Wildlife Service. "The number of wolves we had to remove this past year - based on current protocols - demonstrates the need for an interdiction program that addresses the issue of depredating wolves, provides economic compensation for financial losses, and thereby allows wolves to remain on
the landscape."

The fact that there were no initial releases of wolves in 2007 also
affected the survey data. Although there were no new releases during the past year, there were some translocations of wolves. The number of new, or re-formed, pairs is five. One of the translocations of a female resulted in a new pair bond for the Hawks Nest pack. Three pairs formed naturally during the year and have been named Elk Mountain pack, Fox Mountain pack and Dark Canyon pack.

The number of official breeding pairs in the wild is four. When the number of breeding pairs is less than six, the Service does not issue permits to livestock owners for more aggressive management actions on public lands under certain conditions. Ranchers can always defend their livestock on their private land from attacking wolves.

The Service has initiated a public process to revise its rule that governs the Mexican wolf reintroduction project and will be analyzing alternatives to refine and improve reintroduction.

"With the revision of the project's governing rule that is underway, we fully expect that there will be fruitful changes made that improve the wolf reintroduction program, and will ultimately lead to greater numbers of wolves in the wild," said Tuggle.

In addition, the AMOC has been reviewing and clarifying its operating
procedures to strengthen wolf reintroduction efforts. The standard
procedures describe how management actions are implemented. Standard operating procedures are collaboratively developed and can be modified by the AMOC. The governing rule regulating wolf reintroduction is subject to federal rulemaking procedures.

______________________________________________________________________
The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.
" Many people think that conservation is just saving fluffy animals - what they don't realize is that conservation is war to prevent the human race from committing suicide. " Gerald Durrell (1925-1995)

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CLBaileyi
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Re: Mexican wolf information

Post by CLBaileyi » Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:05 am

Here is the latest field information on the Mexican wolf recovery program-for those that might be interested. There were no wolf mortalities this month and the wolves should be denning/pupping right now.

From the USFWS website: http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexican ... _notes.cfm
" Many people think that conservation is just saving fluffy animals - what they don't realize is that conservation is war to prevent the human race from committing suicide. " Gerald Durrell (1925-1995)

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Re: Mexican wolf information

Post by wolves_forever » Sat Jun 21, 2008 7:59 am

I meet the person who was one of the main people helping, she wrote a book. I went to it at the Phonix Zoo a few years ago. I also got her book, which I have now lost :(
My avatar is my sponsor wolf Siggi, and his friend Tunyan. http://www.wolfsanctuary.net/

If I had a wolf sanctuary this is what it would be called

H.O.W.L

Help
Our
wolves
Live

I will always love wolves, Forever

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CLBaileyi
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Re: Mexican wolf information

Post by CLBaileyi » Sun Jun 22, 2008 10:01 pm

I am assuming you are talking about Bobbie Holliday, who has been heavily involved with gaining public support for recovery of the Mexican wolves.

There are other numerous books out there that have been written about this project as well.
" Many people think that conservation is just saving fluffy animals - what they don't realize is that conservation is war to prevent the human race from committing suicide. " Gerald Durrell (1925-1995)

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