non-lethal control methods

Discuss wolf conservation and status.

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StarSeeker
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by StarSeeker » Mon Dec 03, 2007 10:54 pm

Wait, if we tazer them, they won't bother us, but the elk herds might diminish but they might star wearing "Don't taze Me Bro" Teeshirts

I am actually serious. Because spaying the alpha males and female will get our scent on them, and then the others might not think of them as their leaders, or as anyone they know, and might even kill them.
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by Lillium » Wed Dec 05, 2007 12:04 pm

Star's right, there whole world revolves around their scense of smell.

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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by pawnee » Thu Dec 06, 2007 5:24 pm

I don`t think wolves would think that a wolf touched by a human would be a human. Wolves have a keen sense of smell, about a million times better than a human being`s. They would probably think something like "uh oh, sandy just had humans whipe their hands all over her!". But I think wolves could smell if a wolf had been alterd. Dogs can smell human pheremones, the question is if a wolf would accept a mate that can`t produce pups.
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by Speaking Skies » Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:33 pm

They will not follow or be mates with a spayed wolf. It would be illogical, even to an animal

The reason one neturers is to calm down that animal, I've seen it in horses, dogs, pigs, cattle, cats...So that animal will be regarded as a weak one, and they will not follow it or kee it as a mate.

And they will take the human scent as a warning to stay away. Its just how it is
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by Speaking Skies » Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:39 pm

To wolves, it is all about survival, and having a mate that will not be able to reproduce will lower the chances of survival
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by Bellamy » Sat Dec 15, 2007 12:15 am

Speaking Skies wrote:To wolves, it is all about survival, and having a mate that will not be able to reproduce will lower the chances of survival
Not only does it lower the chance, there isn't a chance at all! :wink:
I agree though.
the question is if a wolf would accept a mate that can`t produce pups.
When it comes to mating, I'm pretty sure an unaltered wolf won't bother with a wolf that has been spayed/neutered.

What's the point of taking a mate that won't even be able to reproduce?

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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by Argos » Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:21 pm

Spottedpelt wrote:How about we ignore all non lethal options and just kill them as they become a problem, it seemed to work Germans in WWII
I diddn't realize the germans had that problem.
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by pawnee » Sat Jan 05, 2008 4:22 pm

umm by world war two the wolf in germany would have been rather extinct. the wolf was protected until recently.

killing wolves doesn`t solve the problem either. by killing an indvidual, it opnes up more space, food and room for another wolf to move in and takes its place. Also animals will reproduce faster with less competition from their own kind.
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by CLBaileyi » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:43 pm

Nightfire says:
I dont think spaying/neutering will work. Spaying/neutering causes the animal to become tame, they wont wander, they wont mark their territory, and they wont fight, so an unneutered/unspayed wolf will take its place as alpha, and just mate with an unspayed/unneutered wolf.
I would disagree with your statement. I have worked with several different groups of wolves and spaying/neutering doesn't have any impact on them becoming tame, wandering, marking territory, fighting, etc. Just read the wolf notes at IWC to see that with all of their wolves, that the reproductive control method has not made them tame or other things listed above.

The idea of this control method has long been debated (as well as other non-lethal methods). To my knowledge, nothing is 100% effective in preventing losses by wolves-any yes, the losses can be significant to some farms/ranches. More work is needed in this area.
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Re: non-lethal control methods

Post by king1-7 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:58 pm

It's a really confusing topic for me. Here's why:

First of all, sterilizing an animal is better than outright killing it, in my opinion. However, if they sterilize all of the animals in a population, that population will become extinct.

This makes me think that killing the animals is the best solution for a second, but then I ask, "What if they just sterilize a fraction of the population? That way the numbers will go down, but they won't drop dangerously low, unless you sterilize too many.

But here's where I get confused: Sterilizing an animal results in dramatic hormonal changes, which in turn affects an animal's behavior, potentially making them more timid. If one male in a wolf pack is neutered and the rest are not, the neutered male might be picked on more because he is so timid. This could upset the pack balance and screw up their dominance order. And, of course, the sterilized animal will never breed again.

Because the sterilized animal won't be capable of breeding, I think it's best if they don't sterilize a breeding parent of a wolf pack. Sterilizing them could really have an affect on the family hierarchy, so should they sterilize the youngest members of a wolf pack first? Well, if the wolf has not dispersed from their pack yet, sterilizing them would mess up their instincts that tell them to disperse to find a mate. Sterilized animals won't leave the pack to look for mates, which will make the pack size grow. A bigger pack puts a bigger strain on the wolves in the pack.


Through all this thought, I just can't come to a conclusion on this topic. :|
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